Mexican Ojo de Dios

Ojo de Dios in Spanish means “God’s eye”. In Aymara and Native American Indian culture, it is an auspicious object. In Mexico, it is named “Sikuli”, and whenever a child is born it will be present. Families attach two sticks or bamboo to each other and begin weaving from the center of it. Each year they weave a few more loops onto it until the child is 5 years old and craft will then be completed. It is a symbol for health and longevity. In Bolivia, it is placed on the altar to represent God’s eye and it symbolizes God taking care and protecting the faithful. It also symbolizes the granting of health, wealth, longevity, and good fortune. Ojo de Dios is typically polygonal and is woven with colorful yarn.

What’s Included:

  • Introduction to Ojo de Dios’ cultural background and the way it was used
  • Instruct 3 methods for weaving Ojo de Dios
  • All materials and tools provided, including popsicle sticks, wool in different colors, etc
  • Complete a 30x30cm Ojo de Dios


Cancellation policy:

All workshops registrations are final – See our policy here.

Next Workshop Info:

Date: July 17 (Saturday) 3:00-4:30pm

Location: WINFUL INDUSTRIAL BUILDING NGAU TAU KOK/OTHER LOCATIONS AS NEEDED

Duration: 1.5 hours